Names of the 12 Disciples

It’s an odd collection of words and phrases that bring people to this blog, but recently someone came here via searching for

names of the disciples in all europe

which struck us as something that would make a nice blog post in itself!

The Biblical disciples (or apostles) are traditionally numbered as 12, though because different gospels name different ones, and also use different names for the same, the numbers don’t always quite add up. Nevertheless, the names of the “canonical” disciples are, in their modern English forms: Andrew; Bartholomew; James, the son of Alphaeus; James, the son of Zebedee; John; Judas Iscariot; Jude/Thaddeus; Matthew; Philip; Simon Peter; Simon the Zealot; and Thomas. (After his betrayal of Jesus Christ, Judas Iscariot was replaced by Matthias). We’ve discussed all of these names before, in posts discussing the influence of Protestantism on the 16th-century naming pool, and in posts discussing the medieval roots of modern names; but here we want to focus on when and where these names were used in Europe:

Country Andrew Bartholomew James John
Croatia 15th-16th C 15th C
Czech Republic 14th C 14th C 14th C 14th C
England 12th-16th C 12th-16th C 12th-16th C 12th-14th C
Estonia 14th-16th C 16th C 14th-16th C 14th-16th C
Finland 16th C 16th C 16th C
France 11th-16th C 9th C, 11th-16th C 9th C, 12th-16th C 7th C, 9th C, 11th-16th C
Germany 10th-15th C 12th-13th C, 15th C 9th C, 13th-15th C 9th-10th C, 12th-16th C
Hungary 14th C 14th C 14th
Iceland 16th C 15th-16th C
Ireland 12th C 12th C, 16th C 12th C, 16th C 12th C, 16th C
Italy 10th-16th C 12th-16th C 12th-16th C 9th-16th C
Latvia 13th-16th C 15th-16th C 13th C, 15th-16th C 13th-16th C
Lithuania 16th C 16th C 16th C 16th C
Low Countries 13th-14th C, 16th C 14th C, 16th C 13th-14th C, 16th C 12th-14th C, 16th C
Malta 15th C 15th C 15th C
Poland 13th C 13th-14th C 13th-14th C
Portugal 13th C 13th C 12th-13th C
Scotland 14th-16th C 14th C 14th-16th C 11th-16th C
Spain 11th C, 15th-16th C 15th-16th C 15th-16th C 11th-16th C
Sweden 14th-16th C 14th C 14th-16th C
Switzerland 12th-13th C 12th C 12th-15th C 12th-15th C
Ukraine 15th C 15th C 15th C
Wales 12th C, 16th C 13th C, 15th-16th c

 

Country Matthew/ Matthias Peter Simon Thomas
Croatia 15th C 15th C
Czech Republic 14th C 14th C 14th C 13th-14th C
England 12th-14th C, 16th C 12th-16th C 12th-16th C 12th-16th C
Estonia 14th-16th C 14th-16th C 14th-16th C 14th-16th C
Finland 16th C 16th C 16th C 16th C
France 12th-16th C 9th-16th C 11th-16th C 9th C, 12th-16th C
Germany 12th C, 14th-15th C 7th C, 10th C, 12th-13th C, 15th C 9th-10th C, 12th-13th C, 15th C 13th-15th C
Hungary 14th C 14th C 14th C 14th C
Iceland 16th C
Ireland 12th C, 16th C 12th C 12th C, 16th C
Italy 12th-16th C 10th-16th C 13th-16th C 13th-16th C
Latvia 13th C, 15th-16th C 13th-16th C 13th C, 16th C 13th C, 15th-16th C
Lithuania 16th c 16th C 16th C 16th C
Low Countries 14th C, 16th C 13th-14th C, 16th C 14th C, 16th C 13th-14th C, 16th C
Malta 15th C
Poland 13th-14th C 13th C
Portugal 12th C 12th-13th C
Scotland 14th C, 16th C 12th C 12th C, 14th-15th C 11th-16th C
Spain 15th-16th C 11th-13th C, 15th-16th C 15th-16th C 15th-16th C
Sweden 14th-15th C 14th-16th C 14th C 14th-16th C
Switzerland 12th-15th C 12th-13th C
Ukraine 15th C 15th C 15th C
Wales 16th C 16th C 15th-16th C

Of course, our data set is by no means comprehensive in coverage, and thus we cannot say whether any gaps demonstrated in this post are due to the incompleteness of our data or due to the fact that the name was not used. However, this is a topic that we can revisit again in a few years, to see if things have changed! One omission, though, is noteworthy: We have not yet found a single example of any form of Jude, Judas, Judah. The legacy of the betrayal lasted long in Christian Europe.

Advertisements

5 Comments

Filed under dictionary entries

5 responses to “Names of the 12 Disciples

  1. Just as a curio, in Galicia and Northern Portugal we have some kind of fossil register of the names used in the 5-9th centuries: they are present as +5000 place names which are named after if old possessors, expressed as Latin (sometimes Germnanic) genitives.

    So Pedre, Pidre, Vilapedre < villa Petri "Villa of Peter" (More than 20 places in Galicia)
    Andrade, Andrade < Andreati "(Villa) of Andrew" (More than 8 in Galicia)
    No Bartholomew
    Xagobe, Xagoi < Jacobi "(Villa) of James" (just these two in Galicia)
    Xan, Vilaxoán, Vilane… < Villa Iohanni (tens)
    Matei < Villa Matei "Villa of Matthew" (just this one)
    Tomade < Villa Tomati "Villa of Thomas" (just this one)

    Now in Galician written Sources (so, in the Western extreme of Europe),
    Petrus is already documented in 775 and is very common all along the High Middle Ages
    Andreas/Andrias is documented in 561 and all along the HMA
    Bartholomew just in the Low Middle Ages
    Iacobus is documented in 899, but it is very rare during the HMA
    Iohannes in 589, and it is very common
    Mattias/Mateo is documented in 940 and it is very rare
    Thomas in 917, but is very rare

    Ok, they were just my 2 cent, just nothing important 🙂

    • This is wonderful data, thanks so much for sharing! We have as yet not delved as deeply into Iberian documents as we have records from other parts of Europe, and it definitely shows in our citations.

      (We also one day hope to include the evidence from place names in our entries, but for that we really need some funding so we can pay someone!)

      • Well, I’m rather sure that you all need time to earn a living/eat/sleep/have family/relations, so, as a reader, thank you for all your efforts 🙂

  2. Jörg Knappen

    The very early appearance of Simon in German is worth noting: Along with the name Phiipp it allows two interpretations: A Christian one as the biblical name of an apostel, and a Germanic one (Simon can be interpreted as a form of Sigmund, and Philipp can be a form of Filibert). The two names acted as door-openers for foreign biblical names to German speaking people.

  3. Pingback: Wait, what about Thaddeus? | Dictionary of Medieval Names from European Sources

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s