Revisiting our hypotheses about dithematic Germanic names

About a year ago we discussed dithematic Germanic names in the Polyptyque d’Irminon, and part of our discussion included a list of names that we hadn’t yet found but we would not be surprised if we would find in future work. We thought it would be fun to revisit those hypothesized names and see how many of them we have since found examples of, both in the Polyptyque and elsewhere.

  • Adalbodus: One example in 9th C Germany
  • Adalbrandus: No examples yet.
  • Adalmundus: One example in 10th C England, one in 7th C France, and one in 10th C Italy.
  • Adalwaldus/Adaloaldus/Aloaldus: Numerous examples in 10th-12th C England, one from the Polyptyque, and one in 12th C Scotland
  • Adalwardus/Adaloardus: No examples yet.
  • Amalboldus: No examples yet.
  • Amalgarius: Two examples in 7th C France
  • Amalgaria: No examples yet.
  • Amalgis: No examples yet.
  • Amalgundus: No examples yet.
  • Amalindis: No examples yet.
  • Amaloinus: No examples yet.
  • Amalradus: No examples yet.
  • Anshilde/Ansoildis: No examples yet.
  • Bernefridus: One example in 12th C Germany.
  • Ebrefridus: No examples yet.
  • Eckfridus: Two examples from 11th C Spain.
  • Ermenbodus: No examples yet.
  • Ermelindis: No examples yet.
  • Ermenoinus: No examples yet.
  • Ermenradus: Numerous examples in 12th C Switzerland.
  • Framenildis: No examples yet.
  • Gisalfridus: One instance in 9th C France (available in the next edition)
  • Godildis/Godalildis: No examples yet.
  • Grimbertus: One example in 14th C France (!)
  • Lantboldus: One example in 8th C Austria.
  • Leutbrandus: One example in 10th C Austria, one in 10th C France, two in 9th C Germany, and one in 11th C Italy.
  • Leutgildis: No examples yet.
  • Madalgrimus: No examples yet.
  • Madalgundus: No examples yet.
  • Magenboldus: One example in 11th C Germany.
  • Nadalboldus: No examples yet.
  • Raganbodus: four examples in 14th C Czech Republic, one in 7th C Germany, one in 12th C Germany, two in 13th C Germany, four in 13th C Latvia, and two in 14th C Latvia.
  • Ragangarius: one in 11th C Belgium, seven in 12th C France, and one in 10th C Germany.
  • Ragangrimus: No examples yet.
  • Ricboldus: No examples yet.
  • Segoulfus: No examples yet.
  • Siclegardis: No examples yet.
  • Siclegaudus: No examples yet.
  • Siclindis: No examples yet.
  • Sigericus: two in 10th C England.
  • Sigmarus: No examples yet.
  • Sigmundus: one in 10th C Germany, four in 14th C Germany, one in 16th C Italy, one in 16th C Poland, three in 14th C Sweden.
  • Teutbrandus: two in 12th C Austria, two in 10th C France
  • Teutgildis: No examples yet.
  • Teuthelmus: No examples yet.
  • Teutmundus: No examples yet.
  • Teutsindis: No examples yet.
  • Teutoulfus: one in 13th C England, one in the Polyptyque, five in 9th C Germany, two in 10th C Germany.
  • Winetrudis: No examples yet.
  • Winegundus: No examples yet.
  • Winehardus: No examples yet.
  • Winehelmus: No examples yet.
  • Winildis/Winoildis: No examples yet.
  • Winelindis: No examples yet.

Out of 55 hypothesized names, we’ve found 18 (32.7%), albeit only two in the Polyptyque — but this is more likely an artefact of the sources we’ve been focusing on in the last year. There are still more Polyptyque names to be transcribed!

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4 Comments

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4 responses to “Revisiting our hypotheses about dithematic Germanic names

  1. Brian M. Scott

    Adalbrandus

    H. Buergel Goodwin, Konungsannáll, “Annales Islandorum regii.” Beschreibung der handschrift, laut- und formenlehre, als einleitung zu einem diplomatarischen abdruck des Cod. reg. 2087, 4to, 39v, has Fu[n]du helga syn[ir] nyia l[an]d adalbrandr [ok] þorvalldr at the end of the entry for the year 1285; in other words, Aðalbrandr Helgason and Þorvaldr Helgason found new land.

    Gustav Storm, ed., Islandske annaler indtil 1578, also shows this entry and in addition has and[adiz] Adalbrandr p[restr] ‘Aðalbrandr the priest died’ in the entry for 1286 in the Flateyjarbókarannáll; according to the name index these are the same person. He also includes the late sixteenth century Oddverjaannáll, which under the year 1043 says: þa deydi og Adalbrandr erchibyskup af Bremen ‘Adalbrand, archbishop of Bremen, also died then’. However, I have seen other names given for this archbishop.

    The Catalogus abbatum Werthinensium, shown here under the title Series abbatum Werthinensium, shows Adalbrandus abbas as the seventh abbot of Kloster Werden in what is now a southern borough of the city of Essen, with an editorial note to the effect that the first six are missing from the list. Various sources say that he was abbot from 912 to 918, but I’ve not found a documentary source for this. However, W. Crecelius, ed., Collectae ad augendam nominum propriorum Saxonicorum et Frisiorum scientiam spectantes, IIIa, p. 44f, has his predecessor Hildibrand (abbate Hildibrando) in a document of 899 × 911 and his successor’s successor in a document of 931, so he was clearly living in the early tenth century.

    • Brian M. Scott

      Corrected last paragraph:

      The Catalogus abbatum Werthinensium, shown here under the title Series abbatum Werthinensium, shows Adalbrandus abbas as the seventh abbot of Kloster Werden in what is now a southern borough of the city of Essen, with an editorial note to the effect that the first six are missing from the list. Various sources say that he was abbot from 912 to 918, but I’ve not found a documentary source for this. However, W. Crecelius, ed., Collectae ad augendam nominum propriorum Saxonicorum et Frisiorum scientiam spectantes, IIIa, p. 44f, has his predecessor Hildibrand (abbate Hildibrando) in a document of 899 × 911 and his successor’s successor in a document of 931, so he was clearly living in the early tenth century.

      • Brian M. Scott

        Adalwardus

        Philippus Jaffe, ed. Bibliotheca Rerum Germanicarum, vol. 1, Monumenta Corbeiensia, p. 36, records the death of an Adalwardus infans in 962. On pages 68 and 69 it records three new brothers named Adalwardus, one each in the periods 890-900, 948-965, and 965-983.

        In Johann Martin Lappenberg, ed., Hamburgisches Urkundenbuch, Hamburg, 1842, the first witness to Nr. CI, from 1069, is Adaluuardus, Sictonensis episcopus. In Book III of his Gesta Hammaburgensis ecclesiae pontificum Adam of Bremen mentions both Adalwardus senior and Adalwardus iunior; these are the Adelvard the Elder and Adelvard the Younger mentioned here, and the latter is the Bishop of Sigtuna mentioned above.

        Crecelius (see earlier comment), IIIb, Traditiones Werdinensis, p. 8, has a nobilis Adaluuardus 1064.

        Die Urkunden der deutschen Könige und Kaiser, Gesellschaft für ältere Geschichtskunde, vol. 1, Die Urkunden Konrad I. Heinrich I. und Otto I., p. 48 (Heinrich I., Nr. 11), has Adaluuardi episcopi 926. (According to Georg W. Zapf, Monumenta anecdota historiam Germaniæ illustrantia, vol. 1, he was the Bishop of Verden.)

        Maurits Gysseling, ‘Altdeutsches in nordfranzösischen Bibliotheken’, Scriptorium, 1948, Vol. 2, Nr. 1, pp. 59-62, includes a diplomatic transcription of the 10th century necrology of Corvey Abbey in Nordrhein-Westfalen; the list of names includes Adaluuard[us]ep[iscopus] and another Adaluuard[us].

  2. Brian M. Scott

    Adalwardus

    Philippus Jaffe, ed. Bibliotheca Rerum Germanicarum, vol. 1, Monumenta Corbeiensia, p. 36, records the death of an Adalwardus infans in 962. On pages 68 and 69 it records three new brothers named Adalwardus, one each in the periods 890-900, 948-965, and 965-983.

    In Johann Martin Lappenberg, ed., Hamburgisches Urkundenbuch, Hamburg, 1842, the first witness to Nr. CI, from 1069, is Adaluuardus, Sictonensis episcopus. In Book III of his Gesta Hammaburgensis ecclesiae pontificum Adam of Bremen mentions both Adalwardus senior and Adalwardus iunior; these are the Adelvard the Elder and Adelvard the Younger mentioned here, and the latter is the Bishop of Sigtuna mentioned above.

    Crecelius (see earlier comment), IIIb, Traditiones Werdinensis, p. 8, has a nobilis Adaluuardus 1064.

    Die Urkunden der deutschen Könige und Kaiser, Gesellschaft für ältere Geschichtskunde, vol. 1, Die Urkunden Konrad I. Heinrich I. und Otto I., p. 48 (Heinrich I., Nr. 11), has Adaluuardi episcopi 926. (According to Georg W. Zapf, Monumenta anecdota historiam Germaniæ illustrantia, vol. 1, he was the Bishop of Verden.)

    Maurits Gysseling, ‘Altdeutsches in nordfranzösischen Bibliotheken’, Scriptorium, 1948, Vol. 2, Nr. 1, pp. 59-62, includes a diplomatic transcription of the 10th century necrology of Corvey Abbey in Nordrhein-Westfalen; the list of names includes Adaluuard[us]ep[iscopus] and another Adaluuard[us].

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