Category Archives: mystery monday

Outage update + Mystery Monday: Wurgitan

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

But first! A huge shout-out to our technical guru, Dr. Joel Uckelman, who got the site back up and running again Saturday evening. What should have been a simple server upgrade turned into a whole row of dominoes collapsing; first, it turned out that our original hosting service was not equipped to handle the upgrade, and the first we knew of this was when we tried rebooting the machine and it wouldn’t. We switched providers, he set up an entirely new virtual machine and server, only time find that when he tried to restore all the data via rsync, the connection kept getting dropped after 10-15 seconds, making it completely impossible to rebuild the site. After a couple of rounds with customer service, which regularly got escalated up to the next level, it became clear that (a) it was a network issue on their end, not our end and (b) they weren’t interested in doing the legwork to find out what the issue was and fix it. So, bye-bye hoster 2, on to hoster 3. He set up a new virtual machine Friday night, and thankfully by the end of Saturday we were able to have the entire site restored. If you’ve ever benefited from the DMNES and would like a way to say thanks, feel free to buy him a beer or a coffee if you’re ever in the area. The hard work of the editorial team would be nothing without the technical infrastructure to make the data available to the world.

Today’s Mystery Monday name is from the Redon cartularies, a dithematic Breton name where we’ve identified the prototheme but not the deuterotheme:

Wurgitan

Our resources for Breton names are, unfortunately, rather limited; so if an element or name doesn’t appear in what we have, we’re generally pretty much at a loss. If any of you, dear readers, have better Breton resources than we do, we’d love to know what you have to say about this name! Please share in the comments.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under announcements, technical, crowd-sourcing, dictionary entries, mystery monday

Mystery Monday: Viana

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Today’s name is from the 1510 census of Valencia, a beautiful Catalan name that would not be out of place amongst today’s trendy “new” coinages:

The full name as recorded in the census is: Viana Guanyador, vídua, so it’s quite clear that the element is both a given name, and feminine. Beyond that, we really have no idea what the origin of this lovely name is. If you have any thoughts — or any other instances of it, please share in the comments!

1 Comment

Filed under crowd-sourcing, dictionary entries, mystery monday

Mystery Monday: Umizi

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Today’s name is a masculine name from early 10th Austria. The ending makes it likely that it is a diminutive of some sort, which means that we need to identify the radiconym. Our best guess is that the root is the same as the prototheme of Humbert, as that name often shows up with the initial h dropped. If that’s right, then the root can be identified with Proto-Germanic *hūn ‘bearcub’.

Umizi

Do you have any alternative suggestions? Please share in the comments!

2 Comments

Filed under crowd-sourcing, dictionary entries, mystery monday

Mystery Monday: Trauta

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Trauta

Today’s name is from 14th C Italy, and we have two instances of it from the same source — once in its full form, and once as a diminutive. We have also just found another instance (not yet transcribed, which is why it doesn’t show up in the draft entry yet) from the deathbook of a Benedictine cloister in Obersteier, Austria, in the 13th C.

Given this new Austrian evidence, the odds are high that the name is Germanic in origin, but beyond that we’re uncertain. Do you have any suggestions? Any other examples of the name, either in its full form or as a diminutive? Please share in the comments!

3 Comments

Filed under crowd-sourcing, dictionary entries, mystery monday

Mystery Monday: Serentyn

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

In the eleven century period that the DMNES covers, there were — naturally — a lot of changes in onomastic fashions. But considering that that period is only about twice as long as the era from our cut-off date to the present time, it is surprising just how familiar how many of the names are — names are both remarkably fluid and changeable and remarkably stable. This is especially the case when we look at the 15th C (or thereabouts) onwards. The number of Mystery Monday names that we have that come from the final two centuries of the period we cover is quite low — simply because the vast majority of the names in use then are still in use, in some form or another, today, or are closely related to names which are still in use.

So when we find a name whose first occurrence in data set is quite late and yet we still don’t recognise, this is always unusual! Today’s name is one of those names — recorded in Middle Low German in Estonia in the early 15th C, it’s not obvious (to us, at least!) what it’s origin is.

Serentyn

Do you recognize the name? Have any thoughts on its origin? Please share in the comments!

3 Comments

Filed under crowd-sourcing, dictionary entries, mystery monday

Mystery Monday: Riskipoe

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Today’s name is a 9th C masculine name from the Redon Cartularies. Because it doesn’t resemble any other name that we’re familiar with, we’re going to assume that this means it’s Breton in origin. 🙂

Riskipoe

Anyone want to offer another suggestion? If you’ve got any thoughts, please share them in the comments!

2 Comments

Filed under crowd-sourcing, dictionary entries, mystery monday

Mystery Monday: Quintavallo

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

It’s the last of our uncertain ‘Q’ names! Quintavallo is our guess at a hypothetical Italian nominative form of a masculine name recorded in Latin genitive as Quintavalli, in Bergamo sometime between 1265 and 1339.

Quintavallo

We haven’t a clue about this name. Do you have any suggestions for its origin? Another example of it in a different context? Please share in the comments!

4 Comments

Filed under crowd-sourcing, dictionary entries, mystery monday