Category Archives: mystery monday

Mystery Monday: Trebeiza

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Today’s name is found in early 11th C Austria, in a list of witnesses to a charter, and is of uncertain gender (but, given that it’s in a list of witnesses to a charter, is probably masculine). We’ve found a lot of names from modern-day Austria that have proven to be trickier than expected to identify — it’s fascinating to see the strength of the Germanic influence on the naming pool waning the further east and south we go.

Trebeiza

This name, however, isn’t a complete mystery! Our “throw the name at google, see what comes up” method of researching tricky names led us to Christa Hlawinka’s MagPhil diploma Slawische Sprachspuren im Mühlviertel, which discusses this name on pp. 96-97:

Triefhaider: Der Hof Triefhaider liegt in der Rotte Dörfl, Gemeinde Kefermarkt, GB und PB Freistadt.

1115 F 13. JhA ist in einer lateinischen Urkunde […] predium Marchuardi Threbeia erwähnt; 1125 predium Marcwardi Trebeie und Trebeię, 1230 Witigo de Treveie, 1418 Trefay.

Ein slawischer Personenname *Trěbějь zu *trěb- ‘bedürftig, geeignet, würdig sein’ könnte namengebend gewesen sein. (HOHENSINNER 2003a:164-165). *Trěbějь findet
sich ebenfalls im Verzeichnis der alpenslawischen Personennamen, dazu ist in der Steiermark 1030 die weibliche Form Trebeiza (< *Trěbějica) belegt (KRONSTEINER 1975:76,167). Vgl. sln. treba ‘notwendig’ und tschech. třeba ‘vielleicht’; entsprechendes ursl. *terba könnte von *terbiti ‘reinigen, roden’ abgeleitet sein im Sinne von ‘opfern’ (aksl. trěba ‘Opfer’) (REJZEK 2001:679).

We wouldn’t mind at all, though, some help translating this, particularly the Slavic elements and the abbreviations! If you can help, please let us know in the comments!

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Mystery Monday: Sarges

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Today’s name is a weird little Low German name found in Estonia in the 14th C. By context it’s masculine, but other than that, we have don’t really have any clue — not even a gut feeling or a hunch. It doesn’t resemble anything we’ve see before!

Sarges

Have you seen this name before? Have any thoughts to its origin? Please share in the comments!

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Mystery Monday: Rody

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Here’s an unusual 16th C feminine name!

Rody

It’s one of those names that feels like a diminutive, but a diminutive of what? If it were a masculine name, we could hypothesize a connection with <Ralph, but as a feminine name, it’s quite perplexing. Have you found any examples of the name? Or have any thoughts of what it might represent? Please share in the comments!

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Mystery Monday: Oiko

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Of all the periods that we study, I often feel that the 11th-12th C is the toughest. That’s when we’ve got a huge proliferation of records, but it’s before the eclipsing of native Germanic names with Christian names (not that the Germanic ones entirely fell out of use, but — as we’ve discussed here before — their popularity dove significantly, and many individual names did fall out of us, never to be seen again), which means many many examples of Germanic names show up once or twice in this period and then never again, which makes tracing their origins difficult.

Today’s name is one of those names, found in Austria at the turn of the 12th C. We have no other name like it, and may very well find no other name like it, and we don’t even know where to begin with it’s etymology — other than the fact that it’s almost certainly Germanic, given the context it’s found in.

Oiko

If you have any thoughts about what it’s etymological origin might be, or if you have any other examples of the name, please share in the comments!

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Mystery Monday: Naurpaud

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Today’s name is one of those names that is just a little bit unsettling: The names which you plug into google and get no hits. Is it a typo? Is it a scribal error? Is it a transcription error? Is it an actual name, just so rare that there’s no trace of it on the internet?! Whatever it is, we’re looking to you to help us figure it out.

Naurpaud

Our single example comes from mid 12th C France, in a Latin document associated with Pontigny. Do you have any thoughts about what its origin might be? Please share in the comments!

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Mystery Monday: Mislie

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

It took us awhile to pick today’s M-name, since there were a number of incomplete entries in the M’s that turned out to be easy to complete; so instead of finding a good mystery and writing up a post about it, we spent an hour or so finishing up entries (which is, after all, the main goal of writing up the mysteries, so we can’t complain too much!)

Today’s mystery comes from 13th C Germany, and is very strange:

Mislie

Context makes it quite clear that it’s a masculine name, but it’s clearly a name the Latin scribe had difficulty with, because they didn’t even try to Latinize it, or add an appropriate nominative case ending.

We don’t recognise it at all, and have no guesses. If you have any clues to solve this mystery, please share them in the comments!

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Mystery Monday: Lifdenis

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Today’s name is an odd one found in 11th C Belgium. The only instance we can find of this name on the internet is the single instance in the Dictionary, a witness to a charter. It could be an editorial error, or a scribal error, but if it is, it’s not clear what it is an error for.

Lifdenis

Is the fact that the substring denis, an actual, identifiable name, relevant? What if we interpret that f as s? We’re clutching at straws here — if you’ve got any thoughts, please share in the comments!

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