Mystery Monday: Ymatke

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Today’s name is a masculine name recorded in Latin in Latvia. It has a clearly identifiable Low German diminutive suffix, -ke, but the root name is uncertain. Do you have any guesses? Have you see the name before? Please let us know in the comments.

Ymatke

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Recent publications

DMNES staff members have some cool new publications either recently published or forthcoming, so we thought we’d do a quick round-up of them:

  • Mariann Slíz. 2015. “Byzantine Influence on the Name-giving Practises of the Hungarian Árpád Dynasty”, in Egedi-Kovács Emese szerk., Byzance et l’Occident II. Tradition, transmission, traduction. Collège Eötvös József ELTE, Budapest. 171–181.
  • Mariann Slíz. 2015. “Occupational names in the Hungarian family name system”, in Oliviu Felecan ed., Name and Naming, Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Onomastics “Name and Naming”. Conventional / Unconventional in Onomastics. Baia Mare, September 1–3, 2015. Editura Mega – Editura Argonaut, Cluj-Napoca. 328–338.
  • Mariann Slíz. 2016. Personal Names in Medieval Hungary, Beiträge zur Lexikographie und Namenforschung 9 (Baar-Verlag).
  • Mariann Slíz. 2016. “Personal Names Originating from Literature or Motion Picture in the Hungarian Name Stock – A Historical Survey”, in Carole Hough – Daria Izdebska eds., Names and Their Environment, Proceedings of the 25th International Congress of Onomastic Sciences, Glasgow, 15-19 August 2014. 1–5, University of Glasgow, Glasgow. 3: 247–254.
  • Sara L. Uckelman & Mariann Slı́z. 2015. “Többnyelvű névtani lexikográfia: a Dictionary of Medieval Names from European Sources elnevezésű nemzetközi szótári projekt (Cross-linguistic onomastic lexicography: The Dictionary of Medieval Names from European Sources)”, Névtani Értesı́tő, 37: 203–221.
  • Sara L. Uckelman. 2016. “Review of Donna Thornton and Kevin Murray, Bibliography of Publications on Irish Placenames“, Peritia, 27: 306–307.
  • Sara L. Uckelman, Sonia Murphy, & Joseph Percer. 2017. “What’s in a name? History and fantasy in Game of Thrones“, in Brian A. Pavlac, ed., The Game of Thrones versus History (Wiley-Blackwell).

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Mystery Monday: Wackerowe

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

We have an excellent source of Middle German names from 14th-16th C Estonia (this one), most of which are completely familiar. But a few are not. Are they Middle German renditions of native Estonian names? Are they obscure Slavic names? Are they in fact Germanic? If we knew, they wouldn’t be mysterious. Anyone have any thoughts on today’s mystery name?

Wackerowe

Please share your thoughts in the comments!

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Typical women’s names in early 14th C England

We’re currently working records from manorial court cases in England between 1250 and 1550 (namely, this source), and are now in the 1320s and 1330s.

One of the things that I love about court cases is how ordinary the names are; these are ordinary people, living ordinary lives. They are not royalty, they are not clerics, they are nothing that would mark their names out as unusual. So what were the typical women’s names in England at this time? Here are the ones we’ve come across so far (all in their Latin nominative forms; the actual vernacular form may have been quite different):

Margareta and Margeria, Johanna, Cecilia, Amicia, Alicia, Malota, Milisanta, Agnes, Juliana, Matilldis and Matilda, Dyonisia and Dionisia, Isabella, Emma, Athelina, Beatrice, and Katerina.

Aren’t they lovely?

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Mystery Monday: Valgesio

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Continuing our recent trend of weird Italian names (we’ve been transcribing and entering a whole ton of Italian names from a wide variety of sources in the last few months; look for many of them in the next edition!), we’ve got a 16th C male name for today’s delectation:

Valgesio

Recognize it? Seen it before? Got any thoughts as to its origin? Please share in the comments!

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Wait, what about Thaddeus?

When we covered the names of the 12 disciples last month, one unusual fact that came of this analysis was our complete lack of examples of Jude/Judah/Judas. But wait! The disciple Jude who wasn’t the betrayer was often known by another name: Thaddeus. What about that name?

We do have examples of Thaddeus — and there are two more late 15th C Latin examples awaiting publication of the next edition — and yet, so far, they are all from Italy.

Huh. This is one of those weird things where it’s not clear whether this represents the unevenness of our data or whether it is reflecting some actual underlying trend. Only time, and more data, will show. But in the meantime, this is definitely a bit unusual, and something we’ll flag up for revisiting in the future!

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Mystery Monday: Usupina

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Today’s name comes from a delightfully varied source of Italian names, both masculine and feminine, from Bergamo between 1265 and 1339 A number of the names from this source are already included in the Dictionary (and you can see a list of them all here), but nearly as many name forms are still awaiting identification. Today’s mystery name we don’t even have any gut feelings about:

Usupina

We welcome any insights or thoughts about its origins/roots. Do you have any? Have you seen any other examples of this name? Please share in the comments!

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