Tag Archives: Landbald

Mystery Monday: Lempold

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Lempold

Today we’re going to play “How might the Germanic prototheme propogate down into 14th century Italian?” The masculine name we’ve got from Friulia in 1326 is clearly of Germanic origin — the deuterotheme is Old High German bald ‘bold’ — but the prototheme is clearly something that has been corrupted over time. Could it be Old High German lant, Old Saxon land ‘land’, making this a variant of Landbald? It could be, but we’d like to see more evidence for lan(d/t) becoming lem, in Italian contexts or otherwise, before we draw such a conclusion. Do you have any such evidence? Any other examples where lem is clearly a variant of lan(d/t)? Or an alternative hypothesis for its origins? Please share in the comments!

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Revisiting our hypotheses about dithematic Germanic names

About a year ago we discussed dithematic Germanic names in the Polyptyque d’Irminon, and part of our discussion included a list of names that we hadn’t yet found but we would not be surprised if we would find in future work. We thought it would be fun to revisit those hypothesized names and see how many of them we have since found examples of, both in the Polyptyque and elsewhere.

  • Adalbodus: One example in 9th C Germany
  • Adalbrandus: No examples yet.
  • Adalmundus: One example in 10th C England, one in 7th C France, and one in 10th C Italy.
  • Adalwaldus/Adaloaldus/Aloaldus: Numerous examples in 10th-12th C England, one from the Polyptyque, and one in 12th C Scotland
  • Adalwardus/Adaloardus: No examples yet.
  • Amalboldus: No examples yet.
  • Amalgarius: Two examples in 7th C France
  • Amalgaria: No examples yet.
  • Amalgis: No examples yet.
  • Amalgundus: No examples yet.
  • Amalindis: No examples yet.
  • Amaloinus: No examples yet.
  • Amalradus: No examples yet.
  • Anshilde/Ansoildis: No examples yet.
  • Bernefridus: One example in 12th C Germany.
  • Ebrefridus: No examples yet.
  • Eckfridus: Two examples from 11th C Spain.
  • Ermenbodus: No examples yet.
  • Ermelindis: No examples yet.
  • Ermenoinus: No examples yet.
  • Ermenradus: Numerous examples in 12th C Switzerland.
  • Framenildis: No examples yet.
  • Gisalfridus: One instance in 9th C France (available in the next edition)
  • Godildis/Godalildis: No examples yet.
  • Grimbertus: One example in 14th C France (!)
  • Lantboldus: One example in 8th C Austria.
  • Leutbrandus: One example in 10th C Austria, one in 10th C France, two in 9th C Germany, and one in 11th C Italy.
  • Leutgildis: No examples yet.
  • Madalgrimus: No examples yet.
  • Madalgundus: No examples yet.
  • Magenboldus: One example in 11th C Germany.
  • Nadalboldus: No examples yet.
  • Raganbodus: four examples in 14th C Czech Republic, one in 7th C Germany, one in 12th C Germany, two in 13th C Germany, four in 13th C Latvia, and two in 14th C Latvia.
  • Ragangarius: one in 11th C Belgium, seven in 12th C France, and one in 10th C Germany.
  • Ragangrimus: No examples yet.
  • Ricboldus: No examples yet.
  • Segoulfus: No examples yet.
  • Siclegardis: No examples yet.
  • Siclegaudus: No examples yet.
  • Siclindis: No examples yet.
  • Sigericus: two in 10th C England.
  • Sigmarus: No examples yet.
  • Sigmundus: one in 10th C Germany, four in 14th C Germany, one in 16th C Italy, one in 16th C Poland, three in 14th C Sweden.
  • Teutbrandus: two in 12th C Austria, two in 10th C France
  • Teutgildis: No examples yet.
  • Teuthelmus: No examples yet.
  • Teutmundus: No examples yet.
  • Teutsindis: No examples yet.
  • Teutoulfus: one in 13th C England, one in the Polyptyque, five in 9th C Germany, two in 10th C Germany.
  • Winetrudis: No examples yet.
  • Winegundus: No examples yet.
  • Winehardus: No examples yet.
  • Winehelmus: No examples yet.
  • Winildis/Winoildis: No examples yet.
  • Winelindis: No examples yet.

Out of 55 hypothesized names, we’ve found 18 (32.7%), albeit only two in the Polyptyque — but this is more likely an artefact of the sources we’ve been focusing on in the last year. There are still more Polyptyque names to be transcribed!

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Publication of Edition 2016 no. 3

We’re pleased to announce the publication of edition 2016 no. 3 of the Dictionary of Medieval Names from European Sources, after a slight delay caused by needing to switch servers as we used all 1.2m inodes on our previous virtual machine. (If you notice any issues with the new website, please let us know.)

The new edition contains 1974 entries with 47392 citations (an average of 24 per entry, but of course this doesn’t reflect the actual distribution, which is closer to Zipf’s Law). This edition contains 55 new masculine names: Alfsy, Barnabas, Conbert, Erasmus, Eyvind, Finnian, Frederius, Frotmund, Giambono, Herrich, Hippolytus, Honest, Honor, Honorat, Humiliosus, Isbrand, Isnard, Lamond, Landbald, Langward, Lauger, Lautard, Leander, Lefchild, Lefsy, Lefward, Leif, Lelio, Lothar, Mirko, Osulf, Peter-Anthony, Procopius, Reinulf, Santiago, Sasso, Saulf, Savaric, Seaborn, Sforza, Siclebert, Siclebald, Tudor, Vigil, Volkward, Walerard, Walrich, Werwald, Willo, Winsy, Wulfbald, Wulfgis, Wulfrich, Wulfsy, and Zawissius; and 26 new feminine names: Amelia, Chloe, Guimar, Hesperia, Hildegilde, Hildelinde, Jocosa, Laria, Lautilde, Leah, Lella, Odine, Ottabona, Proxima, Samanilde, Sassa, Seconda, Sehild, Sica, Siclebalda, Siclehilde, Sicleramna, Sicletrude, Sidonia, Willberna, and Zbincza.

With this edition we have greatly expanded our coverage of Wales, Hungary, and the Czech Republic, adding many new sources and many new names for each of these countries. We have also added our first citations from Romania (an example of Charles) and Slovenia (examples of Berthold, Conrad, Reynard, Rudolf, and William).

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