Announcing Edition 2021!

2021 was a long year. While everyone here at DMNES central has so far weathered the pandemic unscathed, much of our energy has been dedicated to simply surviving, with not much left for working on this project.

Nevertheless, we published our 2021 edition last night, with new entries and new citations across old entries. For once, we finalised more entries for feminine names than for masculine names!

New masculine names

Ansgil
Celso
Odelgar
Volkleib
Volknand
Wigrad

Feminine names

Balsama
Bernwis
Celsa
Semperbella
Semperbona
Theodwalda
Volkwich
Warnburg
Warnhild
Warntrude

Semperbella “always beautiful” and Semperbona “always good” definitely win the prize for “prettiest names of the edition”!

This brings us to a total of 941 entries for feminine names, 1665 entries for masculine names, 3 three for names of unknown gender, and across those entries, we have 78094 citations!


In the last two weeks or so, you may have occasionally gotten a 500 internal server error when attempting to access dmnes.org; our technical guru has identified the cause of this, and it is a bug in the newest version of Python, i.e., something beyond our control. He is confident that the bug will be fixed and a patch released in the next few weeks, at which point he can upgrade the webserver to the latest version and the access problems will go away.

4 Comments

Filed under announcements, technical

4 responses to “Announcing Edition 2021!

  1. Brian M. Scott

    Some comments on the new entry for Volkwich.

    I was a little surprised to find it as a feminine name, since names with this deuterotheme are generally masculine. The deuterotheme is from Proto-Gmc. *wīgą, a neuter a-stem. Its OHG reflex wīg is found both as strong masc. and as strong neut.; OE wīg is str. neut. and str. masc.; Old Low Franconian wīg is str. masc.; ON víg is str. neut.; OSax wīg is str. masc.; MHG wīc is str. masc. and str. neut.; MLG wīch is masc. and neut.; and Old Frisian wīch is str. masc. Thus, it has a masc. reflex in each of these languages save ON, so the masculine instances of this name are not surprising; the feminine instances are more surprising. And in fact the name is both feminine and masculine, and I’ve listed a number of attested forms below.

    The OSax and OE words noted in the entry are wīg, not wig; the length was not indicated in writing at the time, but it is important from an etymological point of view, just as it is in OHG wīc.

    I think that it would be a good idea to mention in the entry that the name has cognate appellatives in at least Old Norse, Old High German, Middle High German, Middle Low German, and Old Frisian. I have no idea whether the name was taken from the appellative or was simply another dithematic construction, but the identity would have been evident at the time.

    ON folkvíg ‘great battle; battle of hosts’ is a word from the poetic lexicon, found in Hyndluljóð and Vǫluspá in the Poetic Edda.

    OHG folkwīg, folcwīc is ‘combat; battle between armies; scuffle; tumult of battle; hand-to-hand combat’.

    MHG volcwīc, volcwīc is ‘battle between two armies; great battle’.

    MLG volkwīch, volkwīg is ‘war between two peoples; mass struggle’.

    OFr folkwīch is ‘war’.

    A Proto-Germanic *fulkawīgą ‘warfare’ has been reconstructed from these, a compound of *fulką ‘people, tribe’ and *wīgą ‘fight, battle’.

    Now for the citations:

    Feminine:

    Folcwic, Folcuuihc (f) 828

    Masculine:

    Folcuuicus (m) 830, (Sankt Gallen)

    Fulcowicus (m) 829, 830

    Fulcovvicus 829

    Volwicus (m) 1237

    Folcuuigus (m) (Sankt Gallen)

    Folcuuig (m) (Sankt Gallen)

    Volchwich (m) Das Verbrüderungs- und Todtenbuch der Abtei Gladbach

    Volcwicus (m) Necrologium Faucense

    Gender not immediately obvious:

    Folcwic (Sankt Gallen)

    Folcuuih (Sankt Gallen)

    Folcuuich (Sankt Gallen)

    Uoluuic (Sankt Gallen)

    Overall it seems to me that Folkwic would be a better choice of headword than Volkwich. (Indeed, I suspect that Folc- would in general be a better choice than Volk-.)

  2. Brian M. Scott

    Some comments on the new entry for Volkwich.

    I was a little surprised to find it as a feminine name, since names with this deuterotheme are generally masculine. The deuterotheme is from Proto-Gmc. *wīgą, a neuter a-stem. Its OHG reflex wīg is found both as strong masc. and as strong neut.; OE wīg is str. neut. and str. masc.; Old Low Franconian wīg is str. masc.; ON víg is str. neut.; OSax wīg is str. masc.; MHG wīc is str. masc. and str. neut.; MLG wīch is masc. and neut.; and Old Frisian wīch is str. masc. Thus, it has a masc. reflex in each of these languages save ON, so the masculine instances of this name are not surprising; the feminine instances are more surprising. And in fact the name is both feminine and masculine, and I’ve listed a number of attested forms below.

    The OSax and OE words noted in the entry are wīg, not wig; the length was not indicated in writing at the time, but it is important from an etymological point of view, just as it is in OHG wīc.

    I think that it would be a good idea to mention in the entry that the name has cognate appellatives in at least Old Norse, Old High German, Middle High German, Middle Low German, and Old Frisian. I have no idea whether the name was taken from the appellative or was simply another dithematic construction, but the identity would have been evident at the time.

    ON folkvíg ‘great battle; battle of hosts’ is a word from the poetic lexicon, found in Hyndluljóð and Vǫluspá in the Poetic Edda.

    OHG folkwīg, folcwīc is ‘combat; battle between armies; scuffle; tumult of battle; hand-to-hand combat’.

    MHG volcwīc, volcwīc is ‘battle between two armies; great battle’.

    MLG volkwīch, volkwīg is ‘war between two peoples; mass struggle’.

    OFr folkwīch is ‘war’.

    A Proto-Germanic *fulkawīgą ‘warfare’ has been reconstructed from these, a compound of *fulką ‘people, tribe’ and *wīgą ‘fight, battle’.

    Now for the citations:

    Feminine:

    Folcwic, Folcuuihc (f) 828

    Masculine:

    Folcuuicus (m) 830, (Sankt Gallen)

    Fulcowicus (m) 829, 830

    Fulcovvicus 829

    Volwicus (m) 1237

    Folcuuigus (m) (Sankt Gallen)

    Folcuuig (m) (Sankt Gallen)

    Volchwich (m) Das Verbrüderungs- und Todtenbuch der Abtei Gladbach

    Volcwicus (m) Necrologium Faucense

    Gender not immediately obvious:

    Folcwic (Sankt Gallen)

    Folcuuih (Sankt Gallen)

    Folcuuich (Sankt Gallen)

    Uoluuic (Sankt Gallen)

    Overall it seems to me that Folkwic would be a better choice of headword than Volkwich. (Indeed, I suspect that Folc- would in general be a better choice than Volk-.)

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  4. Jörg Knappen

    I want to second Brian Scott’s point of view here. To a native English speaker, the ending -wich is stringly associated with the name element from place names like Norwich or Greenwich that is explicitly not present in this name.

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