Tag Archives: Italian

Mystery Monday: Cosmael

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Today’s name is a masculine name from Genoa. If you just saw the name and didn’t know the context, you’d be forgiving for assuming it was Welsh or perhaps Breton — but neither of those options would make sense for explaining a name showing up in 14th-century Italy. Do you have any alternative sugestions? Any other examples of the same name? Please share in the comments!

Cosmael

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Everything old is new again

There are a host of brilliantly clever and amusing little bots on twitter, from those that generate poetry (some better, some worse) to ones who tweet gruesome medieval deaths. We recently discovered an excellent onomastic one, Neural Names, “a bot who posts a new name generated by a neural network every 30 minutes”. Check it out — the bot is good. Almost every single name it tweets is alausible 21st C Western name (sometimes more likely American than British, but not surprising given that it’s located in Standard) and the few that aren’t you could easily see in a bad fantasy novel.

But what we’ve been enjoying doing is combine through the autogenerated names to find out which ones are not new creations, but can be found in historical records. We thought we’d share a few of our finds here today!

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Mystery Monday: Briant/Brianda

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Today we’ve actually got TWO names, because we have a passing suspicion that one is the feminine form of the other. The first is Briant/Brient, which is found in France between the 12th and 14th centuries:
Briant
These French examples are from Paris and Chartres, both in the north, which makes it tempting to associated the name with Proto-Brythonic *brigonos, and to claim a Breton connection.

But if we take the possible feminine form — Brianda — the evidence for this name that we have makes the Breton connection seem less likely, for our examples of Brianda are from Italy and Spain, not France — this would be quite far south and west to find a Breton-influenced name:
Brianda
Perhaps we’re wrong in connecting the two names. Perhaps we’re wrong about the origin of Briant. Do you have any thoughts? Any French examples of Brianda? Please share in the comments!

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Mystery Monday: Alpoh

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Today’s name is an early masculine name from Italy, one which is neither clearly of Romance origin nor clearly of Germanic origin — unless it is related to Old High German alb ‘elf’, which is currently our best guess at etymology. Do you have any other examples? Any corroborating evidence? Any alternative hypotheses? Please share in the comments!

Alpoh

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Mystery Monday: Valgesio

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Continuing our recent trend of weird Italian names (we’ve been transcribing and entering a whole ton of Italian names from a wide variety of sources in the last few months; look for many of them in the next edition!), we’ve got a 16th C male name for today’s delectation:

Valgesio

Recognize it? Seen it before? Got any thoughts as to its origin? Please share in the comments!

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Wait, what about Thaddeus?

When we covered the names of the 12 disciples last month, one unusual fact that came of this analysis was our complete lack of examples of Jude/Judah/Judas. But wait! The disciple Jude who wasn’t the betrayer was often known by another name: Thaddeus. What about that name?

We do have examples of Thaddeus — and there are two more late 15th C Latin examples awaiting publication of the next edition — and yet, so far, they are all from Italy.

Huh. This is one of those weird things where it’s not clear whether this represents the unevenness of our data or whether it is reflecting some actual underlying trend. Only time, and more data, will show. But in the meantime, this is definitely a bit unusual, and something we’ll flag up for revisiting in the future!

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Mystery Monday: Usupina

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Today’s name comes from a delightfully varied source of Italian names, both masculine and feminine, from Bergamo between 1265 and 1339 A number of the names from this source are already included in the Dictionary (and you can see a list of them all here), but nearly as many name forms are still awaiting identification. Today’s mystery name we don’t even have any gut feelings about:

Usupina

We welcome any insights or thoughts about its origins/roots. Do you have any? Have you seen any other examples of this name? Please share in the comments!

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