Mystery Monday: Qustremiri

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Today’s bizarre mystery name is the last of our Q-name mysteries! It’s a masculine name found in 9th C Spain, and, well…take a look at it.
Qustremiri
It’s hard to escape the feeling that there might be some sort of scribal or editorial error going on here…it just doesn’t seem to have enough vowels.

The deuterotheme can tentatively be derived from Proto-Germanic *mērijaz ‘famous’ — the same element that shows up as the root of the deuterotheme of the Iberian name Ramiro (entry available in the next edition). But it’s quite unclear what the prototheme might be, even if we stick more vowels in.

Do you have any suggestions? Some vowels you can spare? Please share in the comments!

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Mystery Monday: Phyofius

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Today’s name looks like it should be easily identifiable as a classical name revived in Renaissance Italy — it has the look of a Latinized name of probably Greek origin (so many Phs…). But if that’s true, we haven’t been able to determine what the root Greek name is!

Phyofius

We have two examples, in slightly different spellings, from early 14th C Veneto, and so far we haven’t found any other instance of the name, even considering other variant spellings. There’s nothing like it in the LGPN or Liddell and Scott. So we’re rather clueless.

Do you have any thoughts? Other examples of the name? Please share in the comments!

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New publication announcement

One of our editorial assistants, Dr. Mariann Slíz, has released a new edition of her foundational work on personal names in Hungary in the middle of the 14th century, Anjou-kori személynévtár 1343–1359 (Budapest: Magyar Nyelvtudományi Társaság, 2017). Even better, you can now download the PDF for free here!

Even if you can’t read Hungarian, the book is still an incredibly useful source, with dated citations in each entry italicized and clearly dated, and if you’re familiar with the standard onomastic resources, you’ll recognise amany of the references to further literature (e.g., Bahlow) in the entries.

Congratulations to Dr. Slíz; and to all our readers about to get lost in Hungarian names — you’re welcome.

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Mystery Monday: Orlofia

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Today’s mystery name is a lovely Italian feminine name:

Orlofia

We have one example of the name from late 13th/early 14th century Bergamo — other than that, we’ve found found in the name in the 18th century. We would love to know if you have any other examples of the names, or any suggestions concerning its etymology. Please share your thoughts in the comments!

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Mystery Monday: Nodia

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

16th C English mystery names are loads of fun, because they are the most rare. Today’s name is found in a parish register from St. Antholin, so we have clear gender information — masculine — but no other clue as to the origin, and it’s certainly not a name we’ve found in any other context!

Nodia

Do you have any thoughts as to the origin of this name? Or found any other examples of it in your own research? Please share in the comments!

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Mystery Monday: Mieszko / Mikso

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Today we’ve got two entries which we’re pretty sure are ultimately one entry. It’s a masculine name with examples found in Poland and the Czech Republic, in Latin and in Middle High German.

Mikso

Mieszko

One reason that these haven’t yet been combined into a single entry is because it’s not clear what the canonical name form should be, if we did. And the reason why it’s not clear what the CNF would be is because this is pretty clearly a diminutive — so it shouldn’t be in an entry of its own, but instead these citations should all be folded into the entry for the full form of the name. The question is: What is that form? What is this name a nickname of? Michael? Nicholas? Something else? This mystery should be pretty straightforward to solve, and we’d love your assistance! Please share your thoughts in the comments.

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Mystery Monday: Liawiso

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Today’s name is an early Germanic name found in Hamburg which is unusual in that we have a number of different examples of it in the same source, including one variant (Liebizo) which we aren’t entirely sure is the same name.

Liawiso

In fact, we aren’t sure anything about this name — is it dithematic? Is it a nickname? Have we guessed a good normalised form? — except that it is Germanic, and masculine.

If you’ve got any thoughts about the origin of this name, please share in the comments! We’d love to know.

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