Call for Paper Proposals: Names as Memorials (Leeds IMC 2018)

Call for Paper Proposals for a session at the 25th International Medieval Congress on Names as Memorials, July 2-5, 2018, Leeds, England

This year the International Medieval Congress celebrates its 25th anniversary with the special thematic strand “Memory”. The Dictionary of Medieval Names from European Sources intends to organize a session (or more than one if we receive sufficient interest!) at the IMC on the subject of “Names as Memorials”.

Names, both personal names and place names, provide a unique way for people, both individuals and people groups, to encode both memories and memorials. These can be memories of individual people, memories of ancient languages, and memorials of saints, miracles, or important events. The special session(s) on “Names as Memorials” seeks paper proposals that reflect this special role that names play. Possible topics include (but are not restricted to):

  • Given names used for specifically memorial purposes.
  • The practice of naming children after dead or living relatives.
  • Memorialising saints in personal names.
  • How place names encode the “memory” of dead peoples and languages.
  • Vernacular personal and place names in early Latin documents as a means of reconstructing our memory of early vernacular languages.
  • Etymology, especially folk etymology, as a way of preserving and constructing memory.

The deadline for paper proposals is September 15, 2017. To propose a paper, send the following information to Dr. Sara L. Uckelman (Durham University) at s.l.uckelman@durham.ac.uk:

  • Paper title
  • Brief abstract (100-200 words)
  • Language of delivery
  • Speaker’s full name and time
  • Speaker’s affiliation, including mailing address, email, and telephone

Speakers will be notified of whether their papers will be included in the DMNES’s session proposal(s) to the IMC by September 25, 2017.

Any question should be directed to Dr. Uckelman.

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Everything old is new again, part 2

So, who’s up for another round of everything old is new again, aka “names generated by a neural network on twitter that are actual medieval names”?

Aulia is a feminine name found in Rome in 1527.

Sania is a feminine name found in Iberia between ~1119 and 1150.

Arnall is a Catalan form of Arnold found in the 12th century.

Lys is a Dutch diminutive of Elizabeth found in Leuven at the end of the 16th C.

Vinne is a Middle Low German nickname of Winrich found in Estona in 1592.

Ales is a popular 16th C English spelling of Alice.

Danel is a Dutch form of Daniel found in London at the end of the 16th C.
Sabel is a nickname of Sabine found in 16th C England.

Alsen is a 16th C English nickname of Alice, popular in Cornwall.

The Italian feminine name Laria is found in Bergamo between 1265 and 1339.

The Hebrew name Asa was used by French Protestants in the 16th C.

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Mystery Monday: Faian

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Today’s name is a masculine name from early 12t-century Tuscany, and we haven’t any hunches or guesses or gut feelings. Have you ever seen it before? Have any thoughts about what it’s origin is? Please share!

Faian

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Mystery Monday: Ebresia

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

There are not many names in use in 11th-century France that are neither (a) new Christian/saint’s name imports nor (b) in use in preceding centuries. Today’s mystery name is one, a feminine name found in Marseille in the early part of the century. While it can possibly be connected with the prototheme ebur, given a lack of any clear explanation for the deuterotheme, this identification remains at the “possible” rather than “plausible” level. We’d love to upgrade it. Have you found any other examples of this name? Do you have thoughts about the ending -esia? Please let us know in the comments!

Ebresia

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Book haul!

We were back at the International Medieval Congress in Leeds this last week, and came away with a book haul that is worth devoting a post to:
books

The Assize of Bread Book, 1477-1517 is a record from Southampton regarding fines related to selling poor-quality bread. It’s a mix of Latin, (Anglo-)French, and Middle/Early Modern English — sometimes all in the same entry so that we get to play “What’s the matrix language?” with records such as this:

Alysawne Chayne vendyt a John Debarde xxviij die ffebr’

(In passing, isn’t Alysawne an absolutely delicious form of Alison?)

Not directly onomastics, but welcome for background research, is Glossaire de la Langue d’Oïl (XIe-XIV siècles), published in France in 1891. It’s been rebound in a beautiful tooled leather binding, and we are not above noting that this played a role in our choice to acquire it!

What do Anschetillus, Daniel, Wimundus, Aelais, Evardus, Hugo, Tustinus, Serlo, Gauterius, and Regnarius all have in common? They’re all Norman names found in the late 12th C, in the Charters and Custumals of the Abbey of Holy Trinity, Caen: Part 2, the French Estates.

From a century later and across the channel, we have The Warwickshire Hundred Rolls of 1279-80: Stoneleigh and Kineton Hundreds. The late 13th century isn’t the most exciting of times, onomastically, in England, but we look forward to a good crop of solid names.

One of the fascinating things about looking at early records is watching Latin develop into vernaculars; sometimes you can be reading a charter for awhile before realizing “hey, wait, I’m not exactly sure WHICH language this is in.” Such is the case for many of the charters in Foundations of Crusader Valencia, Revolt & Recovery, 1257-1263: Diplomatarium of the Crusader Kingdom of Valencia, where Latin bleeds into Spanish and the documents will fill a gap we have in terms of names from 13th C Iberia.

Providing us with a wealth of Scottish material is the two-volume Liber Protocollorum with the Rental Book of Diocese of Glasgow. Did you know that the most typical Scots spelling of John was Jhon? It will be fun to see this book give up its treasures — quite literally, as many of the pages in these volumes haven’t been cut!

The last book is truly amazing — a very detailed edition and commentary on A Sixth-century Tax Register from the Hermpololite Nome — aka Coptic/Greek names from Egypt! Look for this in a Dictionary edition coming soon (just as soon as we figure out the most efficient way to enter names in a non-Roman alphabet!)

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Mystery Monday: Dywa

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

The Czech Republic is such a fount of beautiful and unusual feminine names, and today’s Mystery is one of them. We have a single example of it, from the middle of the 14th century. Have you ever seen any examples of it? Do you have any thoughts concerning its origin? Please share in the comments!

Dywa

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Mystery Monday: Cosmael

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Today’s name is a masculine name from Genoa. If you just saw the name and didn’t know the context, you’d be forgiving for assuming it was Welsh or perhaps Breton — but neither of those options would make sense for explaining a name showing up in 14th-century Italy. Do you have any alternative sugestions? Any other examples of the same name? Please share in the comments!

Cosmael

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