Mystery Monday: Yfaine

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Today’s name is one where it feels like it should be easy to identify — it has the flavor of something from Arthurian legend — which has nevertheless been persistently recalcitrant. We have two examples of the name, one in Latin, one in Old French, from the very end of the 13th C. Do you have any other examples of the name? Know some obscure French roman where it occurs? Have any other thoughts about it’s origins? Please share with us!

Yfaine

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Mystery Monday: Warslav

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Today’s name is a Low German form of a Slavic name — the deuterotheme makes that clear — but what’s not entirely clear is the exact root name. (We suspect that our tentative canonical form Warslav is not the one that will end up as the header name). Slavicists, this one’s for you! Got any suggestions? Please share in the comments!

Warslav

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Mystery Monday: Vorklin

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Today’s name is a German name recorded in Cologne in Latin in the early 13th century. From the ending -lin, it is most likely a diminutive of some sort, but it is not clear what the root name is — unless that r is a scribal or editorial error for l, in which case it would be a pet form of any of various names beginning with Old High German folk ‘people, nation, tribe, race’. But before we declare it that, we’d like to explore all the other possibilities, to ensure that this is not a correct name in its own right.

Do you have any other examples of the name? Any thoughts as to where it might come from? Please share in the comments!

Vorklin

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Mystery Monday: Ucept

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Today’s name is from mid-14th century Italy. It’s one of those Latin names that looks like it should be identical with some ordinary word, but no root word appears to be forthcoming. A brief search of googlebooks for “uceptus” gets a number of hits…which upon closer inspection all prove to be OCR errors, and thus provide no help whatsoever.

So we’re looking for help elsewhere: Do you have any thoughts about the origin of this name? Any other examples? Please share in the comments!

Ucept

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Mystery Monday: Tisvidis

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Today’s mystery name is a lovely little feminine name from 11th C Belgium. The deuterotheme is clearly either Old High German wīt, Old Saxon wīd ‘wide’ or Old Saxon widu, wido, Old High German witu ‘wood’, both of which developed into -widis or -vidis when Latinised. But the prototheme? We have no idea. If you do, please share in the comments!

Tisvidis

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Mystery Monday: Sintarwizzilo

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Some medieval names have retained their popularity throughout the ages, and are still familiar today — and sometimes not only familiar, but ragingly popular.

Some medieval names, on the other hand, have fallen into complete obscurity and even the most hipster of hipsters would balk at giving such a name to their child. Today’s mystery name, recorded in early 9th C Italy in Latin, is one of the latter. For our purposes, we’re merely interested in investigating its etymology and determining whether it was used in any other context — we think it unlikely that anyone today is likely to revive this name. (On the other hand, “Wizzy” is a great nickname. Or maybe not!)

Sintarwizzilo

Do you recognize the name? Have any thoughts about its origin? Please share in the comments!

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Mystery Monday: Rabela

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

There aren’t many names where we have so little information we don’t even have a guess about gender. One advantage of Latin records is that quite often one can identify the gender of a person from the (linguistic) gender of their name; but this is not a fool-proof process since sometimes you get a man with a name that declines along feminine lines (and much much more rarely, the other way around). Today’s name is one that is linguistically feminine, but from the context it was not otherwise clear that the person bearing the name, recorded in 14th C Genoa, was a woman:

Rabela

Do you have any thoughts? Please share in the comments!

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