Category Archives: crowd-sourcing

Mystery Monday: Nodia

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

16th C English mystery names are loads of fun, because they are the most rare. Today’s name is found in a parish register from St. Antholin, so we have clear gender information — masculine — but no other clue as to the origin, and it’s certainly not a name we’ve found in any other context!

Nodia

Do you have any thoughts as to the origin of this name? Or found any other examples of it in your own research? Please share in the comments!

Advertisements

1 Comment

Filed under crowd-sourcing, dictionary entries, mystery monday

Mystery Monday: Mieszko / Mikso

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Today we’ve got two entries which we’re pretty sure are ultimately one entry. It’s a masculine name with examples found in Poland and the Czech Republic, in Latin and in Middle High German.

Mikso

Mieszko

One reason that these haven’t yet been combined into a single entry is because it’s not clear what the canonical name form should be, if we did. And the reason why it’s not clear what the CNF would be is because this is pretty clearly a diminutive — so it shouldn’t be in an entry of its own, but instead these citations should all be folded into the entry for the full form of the name. The question is: What is that form? What is this name a nickname of? Michael? Nicholas? Something else? This mystery should be pretty straightforward to solve, and we’d love your assistance! Please share your thoughts in the comments.

2 Comments

Filed under crowd-sourcing, dictionary entries, mystery monday

Mystery Monday: Liawiso

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Today’s name is an early Germanic name found in Hamburg which is unusual in that we have a number of different examples of it in the same source, including one variant (Liebizo) which we aren’t entirely sure is the same name.

Liawiso

In fact, we aren’t sure anything about this name — is it dithematic? Is it a nickname? Have we guessed a good normalised form? — except that it is Germanic, and masculine.

If you’ve got any thoughts about the origin of this name, please share in the comments! We’d love to know.

3 Comments

Filed under crowd-sourcing, dictionary entries, mystery monday

Mystery Monday: Komana/Komemka

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Today we have a double-barrelled mystery, two names which we suspect might be related to each other, but where we aren’t sure:

Komana

Komemka

Both names are masculine names found in 16th-century Finland, in Swedish-language records. The -ka suffix of Komemka makes us wonder if it’s a diminutive, and that in turn makes a connection with Komana likely — but this is just linguistic guessery at this point. We’d love to know more about the origin of this name/these names, and any other information you might have that would confirm or deny a connection. Please share in the comments!

2 Comments

Filed under crowd-sourcing, dictionary entries, mystery monday

Mystery Monday: Josiere

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

The registers of the Walloon church in Canterbury in the second half of the sixteenth century are full of wonderful names — names reflecting the Protestant sensibilities of the immigrant community, names that reflect the specifics of the Walloon dialect, names that show how the immigrants integrated with the local community (many of the baptismal witnesses are local Englishmen and women). They are also full of names that we haven’t come across before, and can’t easily identify, such as today’s mystery monday name:

Josiere

It’s a feminine name, both from its grammatical form and from the fact that it shows up in a baptismal record where the gender of the child is indicated explicitly. It has the form of a femininization of a masculine name, with the hypothetical masculine name being Josier, but this is not a name we’ve come across before. Have you, either the feminine or the hypothetical masculine form? Have any thoughts about its origin? Please share in the comments!

4 Comments

Filed under crowd-sourcing, dictionary entries, mystery monday

Mystery Monday: Inoffio

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Today’s name is Italian, from late 14th century Genoa.

Inoffio

It sort of feels like a variant of Onofrio (one of the coolest names in the DMNES — it’s of ancient Egyptian origin!), but “sort of feels like” doesn’t explain where the \r\ has gone, or the change in initial vowel. We’d love to have something more reliable than “sort of feels like”! Do you have any info on the origin of this name? Other examples of it? Please share in the comments!

4 Comments

Filed under crowd-sourcing, dictionary entries, mystery monday

Mystery Monday: Hengelestas

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin, other variants it might be related to, other examples of its use, etc., please share them in the comments! If you wish to browse other Mystery Monday names, there is an index.

Today’s name is a mouthful of an early Italian feminine name:
Hengelestas

Context makes it clear that it is a feminine name, but beyond that, we’re stumped. There’s nothing quite like plugging something into a search engine and getting exactly zero hits — on top of not finding it in any of the standard resources! (Unfortunately, the “standard” sources on Italian are patchy in their historic coverage, so the latter is at least unsurprising.)

We’re happy to entertain any suggestions! Let us know in the comments if you’ve got any ideas.

3 Comments

Filed under crowd-sourcing, dictionary entries, mystery monday